Bridging the Measurement Gap Between Research and Clinical Care in Schizophrenia: Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale-6 (PANSS-6) and Other Assessments Based on the Simplified Negative and Positive Symptoms Interview (SNAPSI)

| December 1, 2017 | 0 Comments

by Søren D. Østergaard, MD, PhD; Mark G. A. Opler, PhD, MPh; and Christoph U. Correll, MD

Dr. Østergaard is Associate Professor at Aarhus University in Denmark. Dr. Opler is Adjunct Assistant Professor at NYU School of Medicine and Chief Research Officer at MedAvante-ProPhase, Inc. Dr. Correll is Medical Director of the Recognition and Prevention program at the Zucker Hillside Hospital in Glenn Oaks, New York, and Professor at the Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell in Hempstead, New York, and the Charité Universitätsmedizin, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Berlin, Germany.

Funding: No funding was provided for this article.

Disclosures: The home institution of SD Østergaard (Aarhus University) holds one-third of the copyright for the Simplified Negative and Positive Symptoms Interview (SNAPSI). Dr. Correll has been a consultant and/or advisor to or has received honoraria from: Alkermes, Allergan, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Gerson Lehrman Group, IntraCellular Therapies, Janssen/J&J, LB Pharma, Lundbeck, Medavante, Medscape, Neurocrine, Otsuka, Pfizer, Sunovion, Takeda, and Teva. He has provided expert testimony for Bristol-Myers Squibb, Janssen, and Otsuka. He served on a Data Safety Monitoring Board for Lundbeck and Pfizer. He received grant support from Takeda. The home institution of Dr. Correll (The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, New York, USA) holds one-third of the copyright for the SNAPSI. The home institution of Dr. Opler (MedAvante-ProPhase Inc.) holds one-third of the copyright for the SNAPSI. Dr. Opler also has received grant funding from US NIMH, the Brain and Behavior Foundation (formerly NARSAD), the Stanley Research Foundation, and the Qatar National Research Fund.

Abstract: There is currently a “measurement gap” between research and clinical care in schizophrenia. The main reason behind this gap is that the most widely used rating scale in schizophrenia research, the 30-item Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), takes so long to administer that it is rarely used in clinical practice. This compromises the translation of research findings into clinical care and vice versa. The aim of this paper is to discuss how this measurement gap can be closed. Specifically, the main points of discussion are 1) the practical problems associated with using the full 30-item PANSS in clinical practice; 2) how the brief, six-item version of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS-6) was derived empirically from the full 30-item PANSS and what the initial results obtained with PANSS-6 entail; and 3) how PANSS-6 ratings, guided by the newly developed, 15–25-minute, stand-alone Simplified Negative and Positive Symptoms Interview (SNAPSI), might help bridge the measurement gap between research and clinical care in schizophrenia. The full 30-item PANSS is often used in research studies, but is too time consuming to allow for routine clinical use. Recent studies suggest that the much briefer PANSS-6 is a psychometrically valid measure of core positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia and that the scale is sensitive to symptom improvement following pharmacological treatment. SNAPSI is a brief interview that yields the information needed to rate PANSS-6 (and other brief rating scales). We believe that PANSS-6 ratings guided by SNAPSI will help bridge the measurement gap between research and clinical care in schizophrenia.

Keywords: Schizophrenia, psychometrics, rating scale, measurement-based care

Innov Clin Neurosci. 2017;14(11–12):68–72


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Category: Assessment Tools, Commentary, Drug Development, Past Articles, Patient Assessment, Psychiatry, Psychopharmacology, Scales, Schizophrenia, Trial Methodology

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